Here’s a question for a British citizen:

“When was the last time you visited another European country on the continent?”

Because I can hedge my bets on if the answer is: “in the last year or so” one may have been more likely to have voted “remain” in the EU referendum.

As a pro-European, I sit here in a European country surrounded by people I have met from all over Europe to read an article on the progress of Brexit so far, and I still cannot understand why just over half of the voting population would vote to leave Europe, and nor can they.

Our location in the UK, coupled with our British values make us actually quite far removed from Europe already. We have our own currency, we predominantly govern ourselves, and we make our own laws; yet we are part of something bigger.

Think of the company Virgin. The parent conglomerate is Virgin, and the branches are Virgin Media, Virgin Airlines, Virgin Trains and so on. Each is almost an independent company which sets it own rules, and is each directed by a different person, but it it is overseen by the vision of the founders of Virgin.

So the UK is its own company, and we look after ourselves like we are our own company. But ultimately we are a branch of Europe.

When Virgin Airlines was in decline, Branson sold Virgin Records to invest the money back in the Airline. When Britain was in recession in 2008, we were bailed out by our fellow branches from the same tree (as well as other non-EU countries). And when Greece suffered financial problems throughout the last few years, they were bailed out by other European Union members.

Copenhagen Nyhavn

We have European laws. However, the vast majority of our laws did not change whenever we joined the euro zone in 1973. European laws do not have to be implemented in every country. If a country decides it does not want to comply with a law, it doesn’t have to, but it has to show that it has something put in place instead. Just like in the UK when a bill is passed through the Parliament: it has to be voted on in the cabinet in the commons and in the House of Lords, if it is not then it is  passed backwards and forwards until it is.

This is why in the UK we drive on the other side of the road and the other side of the car to other European countries–and the rest of the world for that matter.

It is unclear what the percentage of EU laws are implemented in the UK, as there is no distinct definition of what is an EU law. However, in research conducted by the BBC in the referendum campaign: of “945 acts of parliament implemented between 1993-2014, 231 implemented were of EU obligation.” And of over 33,000 statutory instruments implemented in the same period, 4,283 were of EU obligations.

But why is it important to show the number of EU laws the UK has opposed? The EU are the not the enemy, and the whole point of an EU law is so countries in the union can operate on the same level.

Spending new year in Berlin with people from Germany, Portugal, and Venezuela

To apply for EU membership is difficult, and the country in question has to show that it respects the common values of the member states. Article two of the Lisbon Treaty outlines these values as: “Respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law and respect for human rights”.

For example, Turkey is geographically in Europe, yet it has never been recognised as European by its neighbours. To quote the Author Tim Marshall: “Istanbul was European City of Culture 2010, it competes in the Eurovision Song Contest and the UEFA European Championship”; but it is not part of the European Union despite applying for membership in the 1970’s, it has been continually rejected. Factors include its record on human rights, its economy, and the disparity of living conditions.

Here in the EU there are so many opportunities for people of different nationalities within Europe to have free movement, to live, work and retire in a different country while still receiving all of the benefits of their country like pensions.

Being in the EU has given us cheaper and safer holidays without having visas, as so much security is invested in EU airports and online for things like buying a ticket abroad. We have European health insurance, free trade deals, access to the single market, and access to one of the biggest economies in the world.

The Berlin Wall represents a lot of things, the main one being separation of a nation. Why do we want to separate Europe?

We pay a hefty membership to be part of this member state, as one does for a club. But just like in your local athletics, darts, or Harry Potter club you receive something in return: a cape, a club house, weekly training sessions, equipment, subsidised entry fees, insurance, and membership to the worldwide Harry Potter alliance.

EU money pays for our roads in areas like Cornwall as part of the regeneration scheme, bridges and infrastructure in some British cities, investment to the NHS, renewable energy infracstrure, and some government schemes are partially funded by the EU. Wales is the biggest benefitter of EU funding (in terms of UK countries) as it goes through regeneration.

 

Why wouldn’t a tiny island in the sea want to be part of that?

The EU was set up after the Second World War as a peace organisation between member states. In the 1970’s the UK became a member of the ECC (now the EU) and a few years later had a referendum vote. The British public voted to stay in the EU, so what has happened since?

The nonesense debate about taking control of our borders has been going on since the 1960’s and it will continue to go on forever more. But if we have free movement to places like Spain, Germany, France and Portugal, why should those citizens not have free movement to the UK?

Let’s not forget our country is surrounded by the sea. There are exceptions to the rule on how people enter illegally, (such as the immigration crisis in Calais last year) but that happens in every country, and yes changes need to be made to prevent this but the numbers are minuscule in terms of the bigger picture. For anyone to get in, unless they arrive by swimming they have to go through a border.

To obtain a UK visa for non-EU citizens is now extremely difficult. First of all it is not a simple as just getting a visa, there are so many different types. Which cost different amounts and the individual receives different benefits, such as receiving NHS care the same as a UK tax payer.

In Germany I met an Australian girl who applied for a visa, it her cost $1,000 AUS dollars, (the price has recently gone up) and she has to sit a test. This is not a girl who is coming in the country to “take our jobs” she has a profession and is looking for a place in Europe to settle in, and to simply pass through the UK to visit some friends in Edinburgh, she still has to go through this process.

An EU source told the BBC: Everyone in EU parliament think “the Brits have lost it.”

Back to Brexit, the leave campaign did make some good points, and there are so many things that need to be improved in the EU, such as all of the problems surrounded by the migrant crisis last year, trade deals, and so on. But look at the way the referendum ended…

The Leave campaign was taken to court over “knowingly misleading” voters over the figure of £350bn paid to Europe every week, which was found to be purely mythical. In addition to this, take a look at the politicians who were heading the campaign: one is the former and current, and former and current leader of the UK Independence Party. Another is a former cabinet minister who was sacked after the by-election. And the final is Boris Johnson: a once good Mayor of London who stood for two terms, but since failed on his dream to become Prime Minister. Instead settled for a role too far out of his depth as foreign secretary, as a result the international reaction was “overwhelmingly negative”. After the news of Johnson as foreign secretary, an EU source told the BBC: Everyone in EU parliament think “the Brits have lost it.”

This is not to say the referendum was a waste of time (and money–whose money?). The Brexit campaign posed some good arguments and the EU is by no means a model union. If it were, the UK would have implemented a lot more of EU laws, right? And we might drive on the wrong side of the road and the wrong side of the car.

Lyon, France

The Switzerland model works well for the EU and Switzerland. But Switzerland have products and an industry to trade. Much of the British industry has been sold off to foreign companies either in Europe or the rest of the world such as the French energy company EDF who own many UK power stations. The outstanding Chinese trade deal for nuclear power stations, the steel works in the North East is now owned outside of the UK. We have our British farming industry to trade because the produce we consume in this country is imported, yet farmers subsidiaries come from the EU. Where will it end?

A quote from a prisoner at Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp in Berlin.

On my travels in Europe, I have so far met people from Germany, Portugal, Denmark, France, and Brazil, and I have been in three cities for less than a week overall. We learn by meeting people from all over the world, seeing how different counties operate, and how people communicate. A cosmopolitan Europe is a good thing, but in the UK we seem to be scared of growth, and regeneration. Of Brits under 24, 75 percent voted to remain in the EU. That means a variety of things, that people under 24 want a diverse Britain, they want access to other European countries, because that means more opportunities.

In Copenhagen I made friends with a Portuguese guy, I asked why he settled in Denmark and he said because the wages are much higher and the living conditions are much better. In a medium scale job (not a manager or a supervisor) in one day he earns a the equivalent of a week’s wage in Portugal.

One day I would hope to do the same, to move to a different country for a while, work in a different industry and experience life in a different country. Being part of the EU makes that much easier.

As I discuss the brexit situation with these people from all over Europe, I feel embarrassed to say that nearly 52 percent of the UK voters voted to leave the EU.

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